Dominus Venustas

Art writer. Art reader. Art lover.
Art is a language. One that speaks of truth and of humanity. I am on a journey to discover the Masters of Art and shine a light on their greatness. By Jackie Honsig-Erlenburg
Matisse’s Studio Interior painted by Matisse. Very insightful. The easel, the canvases, frames, stool, flowers, vase and lemon.
Derive happiness in oneself from a good day’s work, from illumination, the fog that surrounds.
And work hard he did. Always in the studio. Always drawing, painting and creating. Respect.

Matisse’s Studio Interior painted by Matisse. Very insightful. The easel, the canvases, frames, stool, flowers, vase and lemon.

Derive happiness in oneself from a good day’s work, from illumination, the fog that surrounds.

And work hard he did. Always in the studio. Always drawing, painting and creating. Respect.

Giotto. 
The Italian artist of the early fourteenth century is often acknowledged as the father of Renaissance art. His work portrayed psychology and physiognomy, and in doing so he brought forth pathos and humanity in painting.
Here… a beautifully constructed composition of colour and form, dancing before our eyes.
Vasari wrote of him '…he brought to life the great art of painting as we know it today, introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.'
*Love*

Giotto. 

The Italian artist of the early fourteenth century is often acknowledged as the father of Renaissance art. His work portrayed psychology and physiognomy, and in doing so he brought forth pathos and humanity in painting.

Here… a beautifully constructed composition of colour and form, dancing before our eyes.

Vasari wrote of him '…he brought to life the great art of painting as we know it today, introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.'

*Love*

One of Degas' rare landscapes and a study of the sky. Like Manet, Degas preferred drawing and painting the human figure rather than the outdoors. However, when he did so, the results were breathtaking.

What is certain is that setting a piece of nature in place and drawing it are two very different things.

Painting must give us the flavour of nature’s eternity. Everything, you understand. So I join together nature’s straying hands… From all sides, here there and everywhere, I select colours, tones, shades; I set them down, I bring them together… They make lines, they become objects - rocks, trees - without my thinking about them…
Cezanne the father of modern art, painted from nature in a most intuitive… and constructed way. He was poetic and sincere. These beautifully expressed words are testimony to that. Such a joy to read.

Painting must give us the flavour of nature’s eternity. Everything, you understand. So I join together nature’s straying hands… From all sides, here there and everywhere, I select colours, tones, shades; I set them down, I bring them together… They make lines, they become objects - rocks, trees - without my thinking about them…

Cezanne the father of modern art, painted from nature in a most intuitive… and constructed way. He was poetic and sincere. These beautifully expressed words are testimony to that. Such a joy to read.

Brassai and his haunting images of Paris nights do epitomise the romance of the city.
…and always leaves one wanting more.

Brassai and his haunting images of Paris nights do epitomise the romance of the city.

…and always leaves one wanting more.

Sofonisba Anguissola was a painter from the Renaissance era. 
As a young woman visiting Rome she met Michelangelo who spoke of her talent. Quite the validation! 
An official court painter of the King of Spain, she certainly was a success in her lifetime.
Vasari said of her, “she has shown greater application and better grace than any other woman of our age in her endeavours at drawing; she has thus succeeded not only in drawing, colouring and painting from nature, and copying excellently from others, but by herself has created rare and very beautiful paintings.” 

Sofonisba Anguissola was a painter from the Renaissance era. 

As a young woman visiting Rome she met Michelangelo who spoke of her talent. Quite the validation! 

An official court painter of the King of Spain, she certainly was a success in her lifetime.

Vasari said of her, she has shown greater application and better grace than any other woman of our age in her endeavours at drawing; she has thus succeeded not only in drawing, colouring and painting from nature, and copying excellently from others, but by herself has created rare and very beautiful paintings.” 

Gustav Klimt spent some summers on Lake Attersee near Salzburg. He painted the lakes, he drank coffee and he relaxed with close friends.

*No he hasn’t fainted - he is relaxing…

Lovely.

A beautiful early Cezanne. It has a wonderful feeling of rural idyllic calm. 
Style is not created through servile imitation of the masters; it proceeds from the artist’s own particular way of feeling and expressing himself.
- Cezanne

A beautiful early Cezanne. It has a wonderful feeling of rural idyllic calm. 

Style is not created through servile imitation of the masters; it proceeds from the artist’s own particular way of feeling and expressing himself.

- Cezanne

Gauguin. Portrait of a Young Woman. Gorgeousness. 
Color! What a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams. 
And more from the great man.
The great artist is a formulation of the greatest intelligence: he is the recipient of sensations which are the most delicate and consequently the most invisible expressions of the brain. 

Gauguin. Portrait of a Young Woman. Gorgeousness. 

Color! What a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams. 

And more from the great man.

The great artist is a formulation of the greatest intelligence: he is the recipient of sensations which are the most delicate and consequently the most invisible expressions of the brain. 

Edvard Munch has given us a lovely portrayal of a seated young girl. Although the face isn’t completely resolved it is a sketch that does capture the energy of the sitter and the moment. 
I build a kind of wall between myself and the model so that I can paint in peace behind it. Otherwise, she might say something that confuses and distracts me.
- Munch

Edvard Munch has given us a lovely portrayal of a seated young girl. Although the face isn’t completely resolved it is a sketch that does capture the energy of the sitter and the moment. 

I build a kind of wall between myself and the model so that I can paint in peace behind it. Otherwise, she might say something that confuses and distracts me.

- Munch